510th Fighter Squadron

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Killed In Action

Killed In Action (7)

1968-07-28 Maj Elwin R. Shain

Written by Published in Killed In Action

Maj Elwin Rox Shain was born on Aug 27, 1931 in Iowa City, Iowa. He entered the Air Force and was assigned to Vietnam on Aug 30, 1967. As a Fixed-Wing pilot, he crash landed while flying over the hostile territory of Phuoc Long, South Vietnam on Jul 28, 1968.

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1967-11-19 Maj Duncan P. Smyly

Written by Published in Killed In Action

Duncan Pagett Smyly was born on May13, 1934 in Ruffin, South Carolina. Enemy retaliation against the “Buzzards” caused the loss of one aircraft and its pilot, Captain Duncan P. Smyly.  On November 11, 1967, Major Duncan P. Smyly and Lt Kirk Brimmer were scrambled off the alert pad to support friendly troops in contact with the enemy. Captain Smyly was on a napalm pass when his aircraft was hit by enemy fires. His attempted ejection was unsuccessful. 

Maj Smyly's body was recovered. His religion was Methodist.

Vietnam War Memorial: Panel 30E Line 34.

National Archive Record

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1967-06-22 A1C Victor M. Negron

Written by Published in Killed In Action

A1C Victor Manuel Negron was born on Mar 01, 1945 in Bayonne, New Jersey. He entered the Air Force and was assigned to Vietnam on Jun 22, 1967. As a squadron clerk, A1C Negron was fatally wounded when a plane from another unit exploded over Bien Hoa AB, South Vietnam on Sep 19, 1967.

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1967-03-12 A2C Gary W. Cosgrave

Written by David Sarvai Published in Killed In Action

A3C Gary Wayne Cosgrave May 12, 1967
FREDERICK NEWS-POST May 12, 1967
SIX AMERICAN CASUALTIES IN ROCKET ATTACK
Enemy Strikes Near Saigon - Communist gunners struck close to Saigon with big Soviet-made 140mm rockets early Friday, hitting the U.S. air base at Bein Hoa only 16 miles northeast of the capital city. The U.S. Command said six Americans were killed and 29 wounded in the 15-minute attack. These was moderate damage to the buildings, equipment and aircraft. The 140mm rocket, which is visible as it blazes in with a streak of fire, has a range of about eight miles. It was fired from maximum range in the attack on Bein Hoa, a U.S. spokesman said. The communists also used 60mm mortar and 57mm recoilless-rifle fire in the attack that was launched at 1 a.m. Communists first used the 140mm rocket, which is fired from a tube mounted in a platform, in an attack on the Da Nang air base, 380 miles, north of Saigon, last Feb. 27. Twelve Americans were killed. Subsequently, the rocket was used in another attack on Da Nang and in several attacks on Marine artillery outposts at Dong Ha and Gio Linh, just south of the demilitarized zone. In the attacks on the Marine artillery outposts, the rockets were fired from inside the zone. The 140mm is a relatively inaccurate weapon.

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1967-02-12 1Lt Peter J. Yeingst

Written by David Sarvai Published in Killed In Action

1Lt Peter Joel Yeingst was born on Mar 01, 1941 in Elverson, Pennsylvania. He entered the Air Force and was assigned to Vietnam. As a fixed wing pilot, 1Lt Yeingst was shot down over a target southeast of Bien Hoa, South Vietnam on Feb 12, 1967.

1Lt Yeingst's body was recovered. His religion is unknown.

Vietnam War Memorial: Panel 15E Line 23.

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1966-12-03 Capt Michael L. Hyde

Written by Published in Killed In Action

Capt Michael Lewis Hyde was born on May 14, 1938 in Boulder City, Nevada. He entered the Air Force and was assigned to Vietnam on Jul 19, 1966. As a Fixed-Wing pilot, he crash landed while flying over the hostile territory of Can Tho, North Vietnam on 3 Dec 1966 while making a Napalm pass; Hyde was apparently hit while in the cockpit and crashed without trying to eject.

Capt Hyde's body was recovered. His religion was unknown.

Vietnam War Memorial: Panel 13E Line 22.

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1965-10-19 Capt James C. Fey

Written by Published in Killed In Action

On 19 October 1965, Captain James C. Fey was killed on a Night Owl gunnery qualification flight. This occurred when his F-100 contacted the ground on Peason Ridge gunnery range.

One tragedy marred the otherwise successful operation. Captain James C. Fey was killed on his first night mission when he apparently flew his F-100 into the ground due to 'preoccupation and/or distraction'. Marginal weather of this night was also deemed a factor.

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